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BLOG TOUR: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

Roommates With Benefits

by Nicole Williams

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NOW LIVE!

It has been a couple of days since the release of Roommates With Benefits (RWB) and I loved it! I’ll be posting my review either later tonight or tomorrow morning. It would be a back-to-back review with Tortured. It is another standalone written by Nicole Williams and release last April 2017. It is way overdue but it’s done! Anyway, back to RWB. It is amazing. I love, love, love Soren and Hayden! They are so perfect and intense and wonderful and I just want to sigh and read their story all over again. I’m kinda regretting devouring it…

Haven’t read Nicole Williams’ newest standalone romance? Grab your copy now!

iBooks : hyperurl.co/ampjro

Amazon : hyperurl.co/7vx11e

Nook : http://bit.ly/2qTjbx

Add to your Goodreads shelf : http://bit.ly/2pK1pwr

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Read the synopsis here –> BOOK COVER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

You can also see Chapter 1 over here –>  CHAPTER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

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Book Quotes, Book Updates

TEASER TUESDAY: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

Roommates With Benefits

by Nicole Williams

IMG_2972

Coming June 5th

Pre-order exclusively via iBooks : hyperurl.co/ampjro

Add to your Goodreads shelf : http://bit.ly/2pK1pwr

Read the synopsis here –> BOOK COVER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

You can also see Chapter 1 over here –>  CHAPTER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

Book Updates

CHAPTER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams

Roommates With Benefits

by Nicole Williams

IMG_2972

Coming June 5th

Pre-order exclusively via iBooks HERE


Meet Hayden and Soren for the first time!

CHAPTER 1

I felt like all of my dreams had, or were about to, come true.

​Waved farewell to Podunk hometown? Check.

​Arrived in posh metropolis with luggage in tow? Check.

​Signed to a top agency? Check.

​About to roll up to my swanky new pad? Check.

​The world wasn’t just at my fingertips—I felt like it was clutched in the palm of my hand. All the obstacles—everything I’d had to overcome to get here—and I’d done it. I’d paid the price. Now I was ready to reap the darn reward.

​“Oh, crap.” My heart soared into my throat when I glanced at the taximeter for the first time since leaving the airport. I’d been totally preoccupied with staring at the bright lights and sights of New York City. “Is that how much it will cost for the entire ride? Hopefully?” My eyes widened when the meter tacked on another fifty cents.

​The driver glanced at me through the rearview. He must have thought I was making a joke until he saw my face. “What? You serious, kid?” His meaty arm draped across the passenger seat. “That’s how much it costs to get to right here.” He speared his finger out the window, two bushy brows lifting. “There’s still another mile before we hit the address you gave me.”

​“Pull over. Please. Pull over.”

Digging inside my purse, I counted out what I owed the driver. Which left me with a whole two dollars and some cents to my name. Ever since I was a little girl declaring my plans to make it in the big city, everyone had been warning me that New York City was expensive. I guessed I hadn’t realized that translated to public transportation as well.
​Once the driver had pulled up to the curb, I handed him what I owed. He waited, blinking at me like I was missing something.

​“Oh, yeah.” I pulled out the last two dollars and handful of cents I had left for the tip. Even dropping the last penny to my name in his palm, it was a puny tip.

​Heaving a sigh, he crawled out his door to pull my suitcase from the trunk. The dark streets looked different now that I’d be walking them alone.

“Do you have a map or anything I might be able to have?” I asked as he rolled my suitcase around to me.

​The driver pointed his finger down the street we were on. “Keep going straight one mile. That will get you there.”

​I felt my palms clam up when I realized I was about to attempt to navigate on foot a city I’d never been to, with all of my personal belongings in tow, without a dollar to my name. The small-town girl I’d been wanted to cry and run to the first phone to call home. The big-city woman I was born to be had me clutching the handle of my luggage and lifting my chin. By the time, I took my first step toward my new life, the taxi was long gone.

Even though it was almost eight at night, the streets were still bustling. Unlike Hastings, Nebraska, where a person could hear the whir of their neighbor’s washing machine by nine every night, New York looked like it was just getting warmed up. Cars whipping up and down the streets, horns blasting, people moving, bikes weaving in and out through it all; this was an entirely different life than the one I’d grown up knowing.

​I loved it.

​I felt like I passed more people on every block than had made up the whole population of Hastings, and the people here were dressed like they were off to a meeting with foreign dignitaries, instead of the 4-H meeting every Saturday morning at The Hastings Grange.

Fashion. God, I loved fashion. Designing it was my endgame, but first, I had to get my foot in the door however I could. Modeling would give me that opportunity.

​By the time I’d rolled myself and my luggage down what felt like a million city blocks, I figured I had another three or four to go. My feet were killing me, since I’d worn heels instead of the comfy flats my mom had suggested when dropping me off at the airport earlier. I’d argued that I didn’t want to arrive in NYC with faux leather loafers, but man, those discount store flats sounded pretty amazing right now.

​Sheer willpower got me through the last few blocks, and I arrived at what I guessed was my destination, afraid to look at my feet for fear of finding them swimming in pools of blood or swollen beyond recognition. Or on fire, based on the feeling coming from them.

​When I stopped in front of the address I’d written down, I had to triple-check that the numbers on my paper matched the ones on the outside of the building. They did, but this sure didn’t look like Big City Living at its Finest, as the classified had listed. It more looked like Big City Living at its Most Primitive.

​Then again, maybe it was one of those apartment buildings that looked like a dump on the outside but was a palace on the inside. You know, to keep the bourgeois away. That had to be it. There was probably a chandelier hanging in the elevator and the hallways were lined with gleaming white marble, but no one would guess that from the outside.

​Doing one final check to make sure I was at the right address, I lugged my suitcase up the stairs. Someone was leaving as I made it to the front door, but either they didn’t see me or didn’t care to hold the door open for the woman in three-inch heels wrestling a monster-sized bag into submission. The door practically slammed in my face, heavy enough it almost sent me sprawling backward. I managed to snag the handle to keep it open long enough to shove inside.

​Okay, so there were a lot of differences between Hastings and New York City.
​I still loved it. A lot.

​It would just take an adjustment period to get used to. Before I knew it, I’d be keeping up with the best of the city girls.

​Once I’d made it past the front door, I paused to catch my breath and take in the interior of the apartment building. So the halls weren’t exactly lined in marble. Or gleaming, whatever surface it was they were covered with. There was an elevator though, but as I took my first steps toward it, I noticed the sign taped to the doors. Out of Order.

​Why not?

​Shuffling toward the bottom of the staircase, I stared up them, thankful there were only six floors to the top. Kicking off my heels, I collected them in one hand and started heaving my suitcase up all six flights, one stair at a time.

The upside to arriving on the sixth floor in a panting, sweating mess? I’d just gotten my cardio in. For the whole week.

​My chest felt like it was about to explode as I rolled down the hall, checking the number on each door as I passed. There wasn’t any marble up here either. Or chandeliers. Or anything that held a semblance of shine, actually.

​There was a smell though—a mix of mildew and garbage and. . . some other scent I didn’t want to assign a name to. A couple of bulbs were burnt out on the ceiling, casting an eerie tone to the environment.

There were noises, too. Music, hammering, talking, screaming . . . other heavy breathing sounds. It was like the walls were made of plastic wrap and painted white’ish to give the illusion of privacy. I could hear every word of the heated conversation coming from the door behind me.

​Number sixty-nine. That was a number nine, right? I checked the piece of paper in my hand just to be sure. Yep. My eyes weren’t playing tricks on me. The door’s paint was chipping, the numbers cockeyed, and from the damage done to it where the locks were, it looked like there’d been multiple attempts to break into it. There was nothing welcoming about this door.

​This couldn’t be the right place. No way. I had to have written something down wrong, or misread the address outside, or something—anything—that would assure me this wasn’t the place where I was about to spend the next six months of my life.

​As I debated knocking on the door or fleeing from it, a door screeched open down the hall.

​“You finally made it.” A young guy emerged through the door, his focus on me. “Have you been waiting there long? When you were late, I decided to swing by Mrs. Lopez’s and give her a hand with a few things.” He was still talking to me as he slid his feet into a worn pair of Converse. His fly was down too, but that didn’t seem to be on his concern radar.

​It looked like he’d decided to give Mrs. Lopez more than just a hand.

​“Oh, god. You don’t speak English, do you?” He exhaled, making his way down the hall. “You’re one of those Eastern European chicks, right?”

​I stepped back as he moved closer.

In another situation, I wouldn’t have been trying to back away from the stranger approaching with a look that could make the most frigid of girls melt. He was easy to look at—a little too easy—walking that ever-so-fine line of cute meets hot. He was cute-hot. Hot-cute. Whatever. He was candy to the eyes, and had we run into each other at the Jolt Café back in Hastings, I wouldn’t have been creeping away from him as I was now.

“Do I know you?” I asked.

He finally realized his proximity was making me uncomfortable, and he stopped right outside of Number Sixty-Nine. “You do speak English. Good. Because I’m not sure I have the brain space to figure out how to say ‘The water bill’s due yesterday’ in Latvian.”

I guessed the look on my face echoed my prior question.

“Soren Decker.” He held out his hand then slid it into his jeans’ pocket when it caught nothing but airtime. “And you are . . . ?”

“Not at the right address. Clearly.”

He leaned into the dilapidated door. “What address are you looking for?”

I had to lift the piece of paper in my hand to remember. Once I read it off, he shrugged.
“You have arrived at your destination.”

That’s what I was afraid of. “I must have the wrong apartment number then.”

The way he was looking at me told me exactly what he was thinking—that I was mental. “What apartment are you looking for?”

Another review of the paper. Just to be sure. “Sixty-nine.”

When his brows bounced, I felt my cheeks heat. I balanced my temporary embarrassment by narrowing my eyes.

“Sixty-nine.” He rapped his knuckle below the crooked numbers on the door. “Home sweet home.”

That was when the obvious started to settle in. “You’re looking for a roommate? You posted the ad I responded to?” I swallowed. “You?”

He glanced down at himself like he was checking for a stain on his shirt. In the process, he noticed his fly was still open. “I really didn’t think this would be so confusing,” he said, pulling his zipper back into place. “Yes, this is the right address. Yes, this is lucky apartment number sixty-nine. And yes, I am the one looking for a roomie, who you replied to last week.”

My heart had lodged into the back of my throat from the feel of it. This was the person I’d be living with? This was who I’d be sharing the same space with for the next half year?

He looked part California surfer, part vintage Hollywood film star. Pretty much the type of guy anyone attracted to males and in possession of a functioning set of eyes would drip some degree of drool over. Light hair, blue eyes that projected trouble, matching his smirky smile, good—great—body; he was pretty much the result of creation’s best efforts.

Most girls probably would have been chanting jackpot in their heads, but I gaped at the perfection that was him, freaking out.

“You said you were looking for a girl,” I said.

“I am.” He motioned at me.

I motioned right back at him. “You’re a guy.”

“Wow. Okay. So much confusion.” He shifted from one foot to the other, tipping back the red ball cap on his head.

“Why would you prefer a girl roommate when you’re a guy?”

Again, the look that implied I wasn’t the sharpest knife in the drawer. If he kept it up, I was going to start throwing daggers at him. Provided I had any. Or even one. Which I didn’t, because airline regulations and all.

“For obvious reasons,” he said.

“For obvious reasons like what? A built-in bedmate?”

His expression flattened as he realized what I was getting at. “You think I’m looking for some kind of ‘roommates with benefits’ type of thing?” He rubbed his chin like he was considering it right that moment. “I hadn’t thought about that, but now that you mention it . . .” Whatever he saw when he glanced at me sparked an amused gleam in his eyes. “I’m not looking for that. I swear.”

“Then why insist on a female roommate?”

“Because the female species tends to be neater than the male, ape variety. Plus, you smell better, too.” His hand dropped to the doorknob. Before he opened the door, he tipped his chin at me. “And you’re nicer to look at.” When I didn’t move after he motioned inside the apartment, he leaned into the hall and crossed his arms. “Come on, give it to me. I can tell you’re dying to say whatever it is you’ve been biting your tongue over since I had the nerve to address you.”

The way he said it, I realized I was maybe leaning toward the bitchy end of the spectrum. “It’s just that I thought you were a girl. I didn’t realize the person I’d agreed to room with was a guy.”

“That’s not my fault.” As soon as my mouth opened to argue, he added, “You could have asked. But you didn’t. You assumed.”

My teeth chewed on the inside of my cheek, hating that he was right.

“If you’re uncomfortable moving in because I’m a guy, okay, no problem. I’m not going to force you to move in. Even though I took down the ‘roommate wanted’ ad when you placed dibs. Losing out on a whole week of finding someone.”

My fingers pinched the bridge of my nose as I struggled to form one rational thought. If this guy would shut it for one minute, I could think.

“You know, and what’s this whole thing about gender equality and erasing those lines that used to separate the sexes? You’re pretty much saying you’re okay with moving in with a total stranger, sight unseen, just so long as that stranger doesn’t come equipped with a scrotum.”

“What?” My hand dropped back at my side. “Gross. Just stop talking. Please. Give me a second to try to figure out what is happening right now . . .”

Squeezing his lips together, he tipped his head back against the wall, making a “carry on” motion in my direction.

Okay. Think.

Swanky new pad was more a nasty, biohazardous dump.

Hip New York roommate was more a crass, vile entity of dubious intentions. Who came equipped with a scrotum, as he’d so articulately put it.

I had an appointment in the morning with the agency, potential go-sees right after, and a whole zero dollars and zero cents to my name. A hotel was out. A really shady motel was out. I supposed I could sleep on a park bench, but instead of just one man, I’d have to be worried about the rest of the city sneaking up on me as I slept.

I didn’t have many options.

Actually, I wasn’t sure I had any at all.

Taking another good look at him, he didn’t seem so bad. He wasn’t tattooed from head to toe, didn’t have that predatory look parents taught their daughters to identify from twenty paces back, and he didn’t reek of alcohol or other substances of questionable repute.

He was no Boy Scout, that was for darn sure, but he didn’t have the look of an axe murderer either. Besides, I was a tough chick. If he tried anything, he wouldn’t walk away with that cute-hot face unscathed.

“I’m Hayden.” I rolled my shoulders back and crossed the distance. “Hayden Hayes.”

“Soren Decker. In case you missed it the first time.” He held out his hand as I approached. “By the way, I’m a dude. You know, to clear up any confusion you might have on the subject.”

Continue reading “CHAPTER REVEAL: Roommates With Benefits by Nicole Williams”